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Sometimes I Disappear Review

An unmissable exhibition showcasing the work of four artists who use self-portraiture to confront, and evade, the viewer’s gaze.

Oana Stanciu !EU (!ME) – Part I

Francesca Woodman [1958-1981] plays the ghost in her small, exquisitely crafted photographs of abandoned interiors; half there, half absent, presaging her own tragic disappearance at the age of 23; a short life to give birth to such hauntingly beautiful work.

The current Ingleby Gallery exhibition would be worth seeing for Woodman alone, but alongside her are Zanele Muholi [b 1972] a black South African whose strong, confrontational self portraits dominate and entrance the viewer with their steely glare, Oana Stanciu in stances at once unsettlingly provisional and wryly timeless, and presiding over them all Cindy Sherman [b1954] grand master of the posed self-portrait as mirror to our weird world. All self-absorbed, but in ways that reach well beyond the self to touch us all.

Not to be missed.

Reviewed by Mark Jones

Sometimes I Disappear is at the Ingleby Gallery until the 13th April 2019.

Marina Benjamin on Insomnia

Golden Hare Books is delighted to welcome Marina Benjamin, with her brilliant essay on that most-maligned of conditions, Insomnia.

Come along, have a drink, and learn more about the intricacies of insomnia, and how it has formed a part of artistic life.

 

‘A sublime view of the treasures and torments to be found in wakefulness. Entertaining and existential, the brightest star in this erudite, nocturnalreverie in search of lost sleep, is the beauty of the writing itself.’ —  DEBORAH LEVY, AUTHOR OF HOT MILk

An intense, lyrical, witty, and humane exploration of a state we too often consider only superficially.

With her new memoir Insomnia, Marina Benjamin has produced an unsettling account of an unsettling condition that treats our inability to sleep not as a disorder, but as an existential experience that can electrify our understanding of ourselves, and of creativity and love.

Insomnia is a bravura piece of writing. At once philosophical and poetical, the book ranges widely over history

 

and culture, literature and art, exploring a threshold experience that is intimately involved with trespass and contamination: the illicit importing of day into night. With Insomnia, Benjamin aims to light up the workings of our inner minds, delivering a startlingly fresh look at what it means to be wakeful in the dark.

Marina Benjamin is a writer and editor. Her most recent books are The MiddlepauseRocket Dreams, shortlisted for the Eugene Emme Award, and Last Days in Babylon, longlisted for the Wingate Prize. As a journalist, she’s written for most of the British broadsheets and served as arts editor at the New Statesman and deputy arts editor at the Evening Standard. She is currently a senior editor at the digital magazine Aeon.

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A St Stephen Street Christmas with Rachel Hazell

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_column_text]On Thursday the 7th we were joined by the incomparable Rachel Hazell for an evening of Christmas craft! Everyone who came made the most beautiful paper stars and constellations and we were so happy to host Rachel again. Following on from this evening, Rachel wanted to tell us three reasons why it is so wonderful to shop on our home turf at Christmas. I’ll hand you over to her! Continue reading A St Stephen Street Christmas with Rachel Hazell